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Yuganaddha Suttaṃ

(A.ii.156)

In Tandem

Thus have I heard — at one time the Venerable Ānanda was dwelling at Kosambī in Ghosita’s monastery. Then the Venerable Ānanda said to the monks: “Fellow monks.”

“Yes, friend,” those monks replied to the Venerable Ānanda.

Venerable Ānanda said this:–

“Whoever, friends, whether a monk or a nun declares the fruition of Arahantship in my presence, all of them do so by one or another of four paths. What four? Here, friends, a monk develops insight preceded by tranquility (samathapubbaṅgamaṃ vipassanaṃ bhāveti). As insight is developed preceded by tranquillity, the path is born (sañjāyati). He practices that path (āsevato), develops it (āsevato), and makes much of it (bahulīkaroto). As that path is practised, developed, and made much of, the fetters are all abandoned, the latent tendencies are destroyed.

“Again, friends, a monk develops tranquillity preceded by insight (vipassanāpubbaṅgamaṃ samathaṃ bhāveti). As tranquillity is developed preceded by insight, the path is born. He practices that path, develops it, and makes much of it. As that path is practised, developed, and made much of, the fetters are all abandoned, the latent tendencies are destroyed.

“Again, friends, a monk develops tranquillity in tandem with insight (samathavipassanaṃ yuganaddhaṃ bhāveti). As tranquillity is developed in tandem with insight, the path is born. He practices that path, develops it, and makes much of it.As that path is practised, developed, and made much of, the fetters are all abandoned, the latent tendencies are destroyed.

“Again, friends, a monk is seized with restlessness about the Dhamma (dhammuddhaccaviggahitaṃ). After some time, friends, his mind becomes inwardly composed (santiṭṭhati), settled (sannisīdati), one-pointed (ekodi), and concentrated (samādhiyati). The path is born. He practices that path, develops it, and makes much of it.As that path is practised, developed, and made much of, the fetters are all abandoned, the latent tendencies are destroyed.

“Whoever, friends, whether a monk or a nun declares the fruition of Arahantship in my presence, all of them do so by one or another of four paths.”