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Sappurisa Suttaṃ

(A.ii.77)

A Good Man

“Monks, endowed with four qualities a bad man should be known. What four? Here, monks, a bad man discloses the faults of another even when not asked, what more needs to be said about when asked‽ When asked, he discloses their faults in full when led on by questions, without omitting any details. This, monks, is how a bad person should be known.

“Again, monks, even when asked, a bad man does not disclose the virtues of another, what more needs to be said about when not asked‽ When asked, he discloses their virtues when led on by questions, omitting the details and not in full. This, monks, is how a bad person should be known.

“Again, monks, a bad man does not disclose his own faults even when asked, what more needs to be said about when not asked‽ When asked, he discloses his own faults when led on by questions, omitting the details and not in full. This, monks, is how a bad person should be known.

“Again, monks, even when not asked, a bad man discloses his own virtues, what more needs to be said about when asked‽ When asked, he discloses his own virtues when led on by questions, without omitting any details and in full. This, monks, is how a bad person should be known.

“Monks, endowed with four qualities a good man should be known. What four? Here, monks, a good man does not disclose the faults of another even when asked, what more needs to be said about when not asked‽ When asked, he discloses their faults in part when led on by questions, omitting the details. This, monks, is how a good person should be known.

“Again, monks, a good man discloses the virtues of another even when not asked, what more needs to be said about when not asked‽ When asked, he discloses their virtues in full when led on by questions, without omitting any details. This, monks, is how a good person should be known.

“Again, monks, a good man discloses his own faults even when not asked, what more needs to be said about when asked‽ When asked, he discloses his own faults in detail when led on by questions, without omitting the details. This, monks, is how a good person should be known.

“Again, monks, a good man does not disclose his own virtues even when asked, what more needs to be said about when not asked‽ When asked, he discloses his own virtues when led on by questions, omitting the details and not in full. This, monks, is how a good person should be known.

“Monks, it is like when a bride is brought into a home, whether by day or at night, she has a keen sense of shame and dread towards her mother-in-law, her father-in-law, her husband, and the household servants. Later, due to familiarity and confidence she says: ‘Get lost! What do you know‽’

“Similarly, monks, when a certain monk has gone forth from the home to homelessness, whether by day or at night, he has a keen sense of shame and dread towards the monks and nuns, the male and female lay supporters, and even towards the novices in the monastery. Later, due to familiarity and confidence he said: ‘Get lost! What do you know‽’ Therefore, monks, you should train yourselves thus: ‘We will dwell with the mind of a bride newly brought into the home.’ Thus, monks, you should train yourselves.”

Sappurisa Suttaṃ

A Good Man

(A.iii.46)

“When a good man, monks, is born into a family it is for the benefit (atthāya), welfare (hitāya), and happiness (sukhāya) of many; it is for the benefit, welfare, and happiness of his mother and father, of his wife and children, of his slaves and servants, of his friends and associates, of recluses and priests.

“It is like, monks, when a great rain cloud waters all of the crops. It is for the benefit, welfare, and happiness of many; of one’s mother and father, wife and children, slaves and servants, of friends and associates, of recluses and priests.

“One who regulates his wealth for the benefit of many,
The deities protect one who guards the Dhamma
One who is learned, possessing virtues,
Resolute in the Dhamma, fame does not leave hiim.

“Established in the Dhamma, endowed with virtue
A speaker of truth, modest and conscientious,
Like a pure gold coin from the Jambu river,
Even the gods praise him, by Brahmā too he is praised.”