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Saṅghabhedaka Suttaṃ

(A.ii.239)

The Schismatic

At one time the Blessed One was dwelling at Kosambī, in the monastery of Ghosita. Then the Venerable Ānanda approached the Blessed One, and have approached, paid homage and sat down at one side. As he was sitting at one side, the Blessed One said to the Venerable Ānanda: “Is that disciplinary matter been settled yet, Ānanda?”

“How, venerable sir, could it be settled. The Venerable Anuruddha’s co-resident named Bāhiya keeps trying to cause a schism in the community, venerable sir, but the Venerable Anuruddha ¹ does not say even a single word about it.”

“When has the Venerable Anuruddha ever concerned himself with disciplinary matters in the midst of the community? Surely, Ānanda, whatever disciplinary matter arises, all of them should be settled by you or by Sāriputta and Moggallāna

“Seeing these four advantages, Ānanda, an evil monk delights in schism in the community. What four? Herein, Ānanda, an evil monk is immoral (dussīlo), evil by nature (pāpadhammo), impure (asuci), of suspicious conduct (saṅkassasamācāro), secretive of his actions (paṭicchannakammanto), not a recluse (assamaṇo) though adopting the appearance of a recluse (samaṇapaṭiñño), not a celibate (abrahmacārī) though adopting the appearance of a celibate, inwardly rotten (antopūti), lustful (avassuto), and depraved (kasambujātoti). It occurs to him: ‘If the monks know that I am immoral, evil by nature, impure, of suspicious conduct, secretive of my actions, not a recluse though adopting the appearance of a recluse, not a celibate though adopting the appearance of being a celibate, inwardly rotten, lustful, and depraved, if they are united they may expel me, but if they are divided they will not expel me.’ Seeing this first advantage, Ānanda, an evil monk delights in schism in the community.

“Again, Ānanda, an evil monk holds wrong-views, he is endowed with extreme views. It occurs to him: ‘If the monks know that I hold wrong views, am endowed with extreme views, if they are united they will expel me, but if they are divided they will not expel me. Seeing this second advantage, Ānanda, an evil monk delights in schism in the community.

“Again, Ānanda, an evil monk has wrong-livelihood,³ he makes a living by wrong-livelihood. It occurs to him: ‘If the monks know that I have a wrong-livelihood, make a living by wrong-livelihood, if they are united they will expel me, but if they are divided they will not expel me. Seeing this third advantage, Ānanda, an evil monk delights in schism in the community.

“Again, Ānanda, an evil monk desires gains (lābha), he is desires honour (sakkāra), he desires to be unsurpassed (anavaññatti). It occurs to him: ‘If the monks know that I desire gains, honours, and to be unsurpassed, if they are united they will expel me, but if they are divided they will not expel me. Seeing this fourth advantage, Ānanda, an evil monk delights in schism in the community.

“Seeing these four advantages, Ānanda, an evil monk takes delight in schism in the community.

Notes:

1. The Venerable Anuruddha was very devoted to seclusion and cultivating the absorptions. He was praised by the Buddha as foremost in those with the divine-eye (dibbacakkhu).

2. When Devadatta caused a schism, Sāriputta and Moggallāna were sent to bring the schismatic monks back. With his psychic powers, Moggallāna was able to read the thoughts of others.

3. See the Appendix to A Manual of the Path Factors for a list of twenty-one wrong modes of livelihood for a monk, such as medical practice, acting as a messenger, flattery, and fondling children.