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Sandiṭṭhika Suttaṃ

(A.iii.356)

Visible by Oneself

Then the wanderer Moḷiyasīvaka approached the Blessed One,¹ and having approached exchanged friendly greetings. Having exchanged friendly greetings, and engaged in polite conversation he sat down at once side. Sitting at one side Moḷiyasīvaka the wanderer said to the Blessed One: “The Dhamma is visible by oneself,” it is said, venerable sir. In what way, venerable sir, is the Dhamma visible by oneself, timeless, inviting investigation, leading onwards, personally realisable by the wise?” [357]

“Then, Sīvaka, I will answer with a counter-question. Please reply to it as you see fit. What do you think, Sīvaka, when greed is present in you do you know: ‘There is greed in me,’ when greed is not present in you do you know: ‘There is no greed in me’?”

“It is so, venerable sir.”

“Since, Sīvaka, when greed is present in you, you know: ‘There is greed in me,’ when greed is not present in you, you know: ‘There is no greed in me,’  thus Sīvaka the Dhamma is visible by oneself, timeless, inviting investigation, leading onwards, personally realisable by the wise.”

“What do you think, Sīvaka, when anger is present in you do you know: ‘There is anger in me,’ when anger is not present in you do you know: ‘There is no anger in me’?”

“It is so, venerable sir.”

“Since, Sīvaka, when anger is present in you, you know: ‘There is anger in me,’ when anger is not present in you, you know: ‘There is no anger in me,’  thus Sīvaka the Dhamma is visible by oneself, timeless, inviting investigation, leading onwards, personally realisable by the wise.”

“What do you think, Sīvaka, when delusion is present in you do you know: ‘There is delusion in me,’ when delusion is not present in you do you know: ‘There is no delusion in me’?”

“It is so, venerable sir.”

“Since, Sīvaka, when delusion is present in you, you know: ‘There is delusion in me,’ when delusion is not present in you, you know: ‘There is no delusion in me,’  thus Sīvaka the Dhamma is visible by oneself, timeless, inviting investigation, leading onwards, personally realisable by the wise.”

“Excellent, venerable sir, magnificent, venerable sir! It is as if, venerable sir, what was overturned was set upright, what was hidden was revealed, the right way was pointed out to someone who was lost, or a light was lit in the darkness so that those with eyes could see. Thus, the truth has been explained in various ways by venerable sir. I go for refuge to venerable sir, to the Dhamma, and to the Saṅgha of monks. May the Blessed One regard me as a disciple gone to him for refuge from today onwards for as long as I live.”

Notes:

1. The full name is the Paṭhama Sandiṭṭhika Sutta. The Dutiya Sandiṭṭhika Sutta, which follows it, is very similar, but given to a certain Brahmin.